2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018, author, baby showers, booksigning, brides, corporate events, cupcakes, dc, events, fundraiser, hip-hop, insurance, irony, love, marriage, Meeting Planning, resolutions, self help, social events, special events, trouble, Uncategorized, washington, weddings

Seasonal Trends

Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall…all you have to do is call…Depending on the season, the theme and colors of your event can change…however the color of the year can be woven through each for a nice POP of color

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2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018, author, baby showers, booksigning, brides, corporate events, cupcakes, dc, events, fundraiser, hip-hop, insurance, irony, love, marriage, Meeting Planning, resolutions, self help, social events, special events, trouble, Uncategorized, washington, weddings

Behind the scenes

We’re usually posting the end result of our planning, but before the big day our team heads a detailed design process, during which we’re running around gathering inspiration, pulling samples, folding napkins, paper flowers…cutting. pasting, gluing, the works!

#babyshowers #bridalshowers
#mdmassociates #weddings #thedifferenceisinthedetails #thedifferenceisinthelove #thedifferenceislove
#thedifferenceisus
#WeekendVibes
#brunch via @RiplApp

2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018, author, baby showers, booksigning, brides, corporate events, cupcakes, dc, events, fundraiser, hip-hop, insurance, irony, love, marriage, Meeting Planning, resolutions, self help, social events, special events, trouble, Uncategorized, washington, weddings

New Month…New Goals

July isn’t exactly the month most of us think about setting goals. In fact, July is probably the time of the year when goals are farthest from our minds. After all, we’re a full six months past the goals we set in January and six months away from the goals we’ll set next January.

Not only is it not goal-setting season, it’s the middle of summer.
And summer means our lives are slowing down for a bit—especially since kids are out of school.

Maybe you’re slowing down the weekly routine in your personal life. You might be hanging out at the pool more, planning a trip to the beach, or leaving the office a little early to catch a baseball game.

Maybe things are slowing down professionally, too. Maybe Sunday morning attendance is sporadic at church..Whatever a “slow season” looks like for you, you’re probably in the middle of it. But a slow season doesn’t have to equal a wasted season.

Summer doesn’t have to be a season of “meh” Sundays, “I’ll do it tomorrow” Mondays, and “I’ll think about that in the fall” Fridays.
In fact, a slow season is often the best time to set goals, plan, and be intentional. If you think about it, in reality December and January are really difficult months to set goals. While the calendar reset in January is nice, those months are some of our busiest of the year. The holidays, family, friends, food…BUSY

But what does July look like for you? Have some downtime? If so, this might be the best time of the year to think about your goals and plans for the future—for yourself and your family.
Don’t waste this slower-paced season, embrace it. Are you going to relax? Of course. But relaxing doesn’t have to be a synonym for slacking. So . . .

What goals do you need to set for yourself this season or next season?

What goals have dropped off your radar since January that you need to pick back up?

Do it now!

Uncategorized

How to have a successful event from start to finish!

Step 1—

Know what you have to work with before planning. Remember, family, friends, faculty and staff members, students, and community groups are all resources.

 Step 2—Assess needs and interests

  • Who will attend?
  • What are their interests?
  • What are your goals?
  • What needs are you trying to meet?

Step 3—Brainstorm ideas

Think of every type of event that might fulfill the goals. Don’t evaluate ideas at this point, just list all suggestions. Once this is done, review each idea and assess it for feasibility.  Rate it on a scale of 1-5

 Step 4—Develop a time line

Make a list of everything that needs to be done to plan the event.

  • Sometimes it’s easier to work backward from the date of the event to the present.
  • Make a schedule that shows when each task needs to be completed.

Step 5—Reserve space

Reserve your space as early as possible.

Step 6—Develop a budget

Most likely you have a set amount of money available to spend on the event, or ticket sales may need to cover all the costs.

  • List all associated costs and allocate the available funds.
  • You may have to contact various vendors for cost estimates associated with their services.

 Step 7—The paper chase

Complete all the necessary paperwork including:

  • vendor services
  • room reservations
  • forms
  • permits

 Step 8—The people chase

Contact all the persons necessary for a successful event (many must have advance notice to schedule these individuals to work)

  • Performers
  • Speakers
  • Volunteers
  • Police

 

Step 9—Details

Complete and confirm all details pertaining to the event.

 

Step 10—The Event

HAVE FUN!!

 

Step 11—Evaluate

Write a brief synopsis of the event

  • participant and planner comments
  • attendance
  • suggestions for future events
  • final costs

 Step 12—Start planning the next event!

Uncategorized

How to have a successful even from beginning to end

ImageStep 1—

Know what you have to work with before planning. Remember, family, friends, faculty and staff members, students, and community groups are all resources.

 Step 2—Assess needs and interests

  • Who will attend?
  • What are their interests?
  • What are your goals?
  • What needs are you trying to meet?

Step 3—Brainstorm ideas

Think of every type of event that might fulfill the goals. Don’t evaluate ideas at this point, just list all suggestions. Once this is done, review each idea and assess it for feasibility.  Rate it on a scale of 1-5

 Step 4—Develop a time line

Make a list of everything that needs to be done to plan the event.

  • Sometimes it’s easier to work backward from the date of the event to the present.
  • Make a schedule that shows when each task needs to be completed.

Step 5—Reserve space

Reserve your space as early as possible.

Step 6—Develop a budget

Most likely you have a set amount of money available to spend on the event, or ticket sales may need to cover all the costs.

  • List all associated costs and allocate the available funds.
  • You may have to contact various vendors for cost estimates associated with their services.

 Step 7—The paper chase

Complete all the necessary paperwork including:

  • vendor services
  • room reservations
  • forms
  • permits

 Step 8—The people chase

Contact all the persons necessary for a successful event (many must have advance notice to schedule these individuals to work)

  • Performers
  • Speakers
  • Volunteers
  • Police

 

Step 9—Details

Complete and confirm all details pertaining to the event.

 

Step 10—The Event

HAVE FUN!!

 

Step 11—Evaluate

Write a brief synopsis of the event

  • participant and planner comments
  • attendance
  • suggestions for future events
  • final costs

 Step 12—Start planning the next event!